chapter 1 – YOUTH TRAINING MODULES

chapter 1 – YOUTH TRAINING MODULES 2017-02-03T16:03:35+00:00

What's Cookin'

THE NUTRITIONAL VALUE: THE VALUE OF USING THE COOKBOOK

Youth leadership can be valuable to the entire community.  Youth have an irreplaceable voice and perspective on issues that they face as well as having the ability to provide new methods of overcoming these obstacles.  This cookbook can provide information, techniques, and ideas for developing new youth leadership tools and workshops.  All people involved in using this cookbook could benefit from their “recipes.”

BENEFITS TO LEADERS

  • Developing leadership, time management, group dynamics, public speaking and organization skills
  • Have the opportunity to build social skills, self-esteem, and internal motivation
  • Creating and new innovative ideas
  • Creating a strong resume with valuable work skills

BENEFITS TO PARTICIPANTS

  • Creating a network with peers
  • Increasing youth development and leadership skills
  • Recognition of youth role model
  • Development of self-awareness, self acceptance, and self-advocacy skills
  • Understanding important issues and information that will affect their lives

THE INGREDIENTS: HOW TO USE THE COOKBOOK

This leadership cookbook was developed by Chef Josie Badger under the support of the PA Developmental Disabilities Council, The Berks County Transition Coordinating Council and the Berks County Intermediate Unit.

PURPOSE OF THIS COOKBOOK

The developers of these materials believe strongly in the importance of youth leadership and youth development.  Therefore, this toolkit was developed by youth, for youth.  Youth leaders must have tools available to provide education and advocacy opportunities to other young adults.  It is hoped that each of these recipes can provide youth with the ingredients needed to prepare and present workshops.  Youth play a critical role in conveying important information to their peers.  This cookbook is a compilation of newly developed materials and already existing tools from other organizations.  The materials in this book are meant to support youth in developing their own trainings and workshops, using whatever ingredients are most beneficial for a particular workshop.

USING THIS COOKBOOK

Each section, or “recipe”, includes at least one PowerPoint, handout, and activity.  Many of the sections also include toolkits, policy papers, and worksheets which have been created by different organizations.   These sections can be used together as a curriculum or individual to meet a presenters need.  Although we hope for you to personalize these materials, we also ask that you give credit to the creators of this toolkit and the developers of each of the materials that you are using.

USING THE RIGHT UTENSILS: MAKING A YOUTH FRIENDLY PRESENTATION

Youth Friendly Presentation Guidelines

  • All presentations must have “interactive youth engagement.”
  • Lecture style presentations should last no longer than a half hour, without any breaks or activities or change of presentation style.
  • All attendees should receive an outline of issues that will be addressed and the goals of the presentation.
  • In a presentation that is “youth friendly” it is important to engage youth through audience participation and to have activities that engage the youth.
  • It is important to adapt the presentations to accommodate different learning styles.
  • All documents and presentations should follow the subsequent checklists (guidelines were adapted for the National Youth Leadership Network and Kids As Self Advocates Accessibility Documents).

Document Accessibility Checklist:

  • Does the title clearly capture the content of the document?
  • Did you use “Veranda” or “Arial” as a font?
  • Did you use size 14 font on your public documents?
  • Too many pictures can make the page confusing to understand
  • Did you provide open space on your documents? (Remember not to crunch too much information on one page.)
  • Did you use bullet points or lists in your document?
  • Did you use language that is easy to understand?

Language Accessibility Checklist:

  • Be as clear and direct as possible. Get to the point.
  • Use short sentences (generally fewer than 15 words).
  • Use easy to understand language (do not use jargon or acronyms)
  • If you need to use a complicated word, jargon, or acronym, write a definition in parenthesis next to it.

Other Things To Keep In Mind:

  • Did you offer documents in alternative formats?
  • Did you include a cover page to outline the main points or topics in your packet?
  • If using a PowerPoint presentation, did you remember to bring alternative formats of the presentation? (Printed copies should include no more than 2 slides per page.)
  • Did you use “people first” or disability friendly language?

General Accommodations and Ideas for Presentations and Events

  • Information should be provided in as many ways as possible. For example,visually (where people can read along), verbally (where people can listen to what is being read), and interactively (where people have a chance to share thoughts and work with each other).
  • When doing group activities, make sure people can be involved in many different ways. For example, if asking a group to answer a question by raising their hands, also give them a chance to respond verbally or by clapping.
  • Allow time for individuals to speak, remember that it might take some people longer to respond.
  • Make sure that attendees can understand and participate in your presentation.

LEARNING THE KITCHEN LINGO:
CREATING ACCESSIBILITY AND ESTABLISHING RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE

These documents are co-written by the National Youth Leadership Network (NYLN) and Kids as Self Advocates (KASA):